Volume 4, Issue 4, July 2016, Page: 44-48
Celebrating Female Sexuality in Baingana’s ‘Tropical Fish’ and Adichie’s Americanah
Japheth Peter Muindu, Department of Linguistics, Literature and Communication, University of Kabianga, Kericho, Kenya
Erick Kipkoech Mutai, Kapkarin Secondary School, Bomet, Kenya
Received: May 16, 2016;       Accepted: May 31, 2016;       Published: Jun. 18, 2016
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijla.20160404.11      View  3899      Downloads  171
Abstract
Simone de Beauvoir’s prediction that the destruction of patriarchy will be realized when women dismantle their patriarchal objectification calls for a rethinking and a reconstruction in culture and feminist discourses of the female body which patriarchy packages as the woman’s curse. This paper is an insurrectionary critique of Baingana’s ‘Tropical Fish’ and Adichie’s Americanah using the concept of the perverse dynamic advanced by Jonathan Dollimore, which is suffused with feminist ethos, to indict gender dichotomies and the limitations of patriarchal structures. The conflating of the politics of sexuality, dissidence and liberation has been overlooked by critics. I posit that sexual dissidence, which is conventionally an aberration, emerges in the texts as emancipating and as a strategy employed by female characters to subvert patriarchy.
Keywords
Female Sexuality, Liberation, Patriarchy, Subversion
To cite this article
Japheth Peter Muindu, Erick Kipkoech Mutai, Celebrating Female Sexuality in Baingana’s ‘Tropical Fish’ and Adichie’s Americanah, International Journal of Literature and Arts. Vol. 4, No. 4, 2016, pp. 44-48. doi: 10.11648/j.ijla.20160404.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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