Volume 4, Issue 3, May 2016, Page: 38-43
The Civilization of Aldous Huxley’s Brave World
Saffeen Nueman Arif, Department of English, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Koya University, Kurdistan Region, Iraq
Received: Apr. 3, 2016;       Accepted: May 13, 2016;       Published: May 26, 2016
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijla.20160403.13      View  3247      Downloads  83
Abstract
The paper aims at exploring Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World (1932), precisely, his criticism of the civilized rules by which the World State citizens must abide. Those rules are, characteristically, at odds with the normal human ways of life that the writer textually describes as "savage." The paper intends to examine the two concepts of civilization and savageness as far as Huxley's utopian "brave" world is concerned. Moreover, it tries to underscore, by means of juxtaposing the discussion of the two worlds representing each of the two concepts throughout the second and the third sections of the paper, the irony underlying their new inverted meanings.
Keywords
Civilization, Oppression, Rights, Individual, Ideal, Savage
To cite this article
Saffeen Nueman Arif, The Civilization of Aldous Huxley’s Brave World, International Journal of Literature and Arts. Vol. 4, No. 3, 2016, pp. 38-43. doi: 10.11648/j.ijla.20160403.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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[2]
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[5]
Ibid, pp. 13-14.
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Ibid, p. 19.
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[11]
Quoted in ibid, p. 13.
[12]
Batra, p. 50.
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Ibid, p. 10.
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[15]
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Ibid, pp. 32-33.
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Ibid, p. 50.
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Ibid, p. 48.
[26]
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Reipp, p. 63.
[29]
Ibid, p. 61.
[30]
Batra, p. 31.
[31]
Ibid, p. 33.
[32]
Ibid, p. 72.
[33]
Ibid, p. 69.
[34]
Bloom, p. 8.
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Chris Baldick, The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms (New York: Oxford University Press, Inc., 2001), pp. 204-204.
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Batra, p. 33.
[37]
Sion, P. 129.
[38]
Batra, pp. 86 & 91.
[39]
Ibid, p. 54.
[40]
Ibid, pp. 51-52.
[41]
Ibid, pp. 63-67.
[42]
Ibid, p. 85.
[43]
Ibid, pp. 57-58.
[44]
Batra, p. 66.
[45]
Ibid, p. 63.
[46]
Ibid, pp. 60 & 62.
[47]
Ibid, p. 81.
[48]
Sion, p. 127.
[49]
Batra, p. 102.
[50]
Sion, p. 130.
[51]
Ibid, p. 136.
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