Volume 2, Issue 3, May 2014, Page: 65-68
Daniel Defoe and Luis Buñuel's Robinson Crusoe: Individuality in Film and Fiction
Bassmah Bassam Khaled AlTaher, English Department, School of Languages, German Jordanian University, Madaba, Jordan
Received: Mar. 29, 2014;       Accepted: Apr. 30, 2014;       Published: May 10, 2014
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijla.20140203.12      View  2612      Downloads  174
Abstract
Individuality is an important aspect in human nature. Therefore, finding a path that could be called his own is the soul-searching journey Robinson Crusoe undertakes in his various voyages. In this paper, the theme of individuality is explored in the eighteenth century novel Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe, and compared to its film adaptation by Luis Buñuel in 1954. Crusoe as a character and actor is analyzed and his actions set the scene of how man would do anything to escape routine and daily life habits. However, individuality has a price, and various consequences awaken Crusoe’s remorse. Such consequences are dealt with skillfully in both novel and film. Nevertheless, this paper aims at portraying a wider picture of how an adapted character can behave the same way he has in the novel; free and liberated.
Keywords
Individualism, Film Studies, Theory of Adaptation, Robinson Crusoe
To cite this article
Bassmah Bassam Khaled AlTaher, Daniel Defoe and Luis Buñuel's Robinson Crusoe: Individuality in Film and Fiction, International Journal of Literature and Arts. Vol. 2, No. 3, 2014, pp. 65-68. doi: 10.11648/j.ijla.20140203.12
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